New England researchers are looking into whether vitamin D supplements could reduce the risk of COVID-19 infection.Researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital want to know if vitamin D can lessen symptoms and reduce transmission of the virus to other people.“Vitamin D, it has the effects of a hormone essentially, and it is related to immune function,” Dr. Joann Manson said.In the Northeast, vitamin D levels in people drop about 25% during the winter.“People have been collecting information about vitamin D levels that suggests that individuals with lower concentrations of vitamin D in their blood may be at greater risk both of entering the hospital with COVID and possibly being sicker,” Tufts professor of medicine Dr. Clifford Rosen said.Rosen is also a staff scientist at the Maine Medical Center Research Institute and is not involved in the Brigham and Women’s Hospital study.While the link between vitamin D and COVID-19 prevention has not been verified, the study would be the largest of its kind and provide clear answers.“It does need to be tested in a randomized clinical trial, because otherwise, we won’t have the rigorous evidence that it’s a benefit,” Manson said.While the study continues, Rosen said taking vitamin D right now is OK, but to no overdo it. He said people should stick to supplements of about 1,000 to 2,000 units daily.“I think it’s fine if you decide that, ‘Boy, I’m at risk, or I’m worried about COVID-19. I’m going to take 1,000 units of vitamin D.’ It’s not going to hurt at all,” Rosen said.Vitamin D has the potential to be another weapon in the fight against the virus.“If there is a chance that it might be effective, well then, that’s great news, and anything we can do to prevent getting the disease is really important,” Rosen said.

New England researchers are looking into whether vitamin D supplements could reduce the risk of COVID-19 infection.

Researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital want to know if vitamin D can lessen symptoms and reduce transmission of the virus to other people.

“Vitamin D, it has the effects of a hormone essentially, and it is related to immune function,” Dr. Joann Manson said.

In the Northeast, vitamin D levels in people drop about 25% during the winter.

“People have been collecting information about vitamin D levels that suggests that individuals with lower concentrations of vitamin D in their blood may be at greater risk both of entering the hospital with COVID and possibly being sicker,” Tufts professor of medicine Dr. Clifford Rosen said.

Rosen is also a staff scientist at the Maine Medical Center Research Institute and is not involved in the Brigham and Women’s Hospital study.

While the link between vitamin D and COVID-19 prevention has not been verified, the study would be the largest of its kind and provide clear answers.

“It does need to be tested in a randomized clinical trial, because otherwise, we won’t have the rigorous evidence that it’s a benefit,” Manson said.

While the study continues, Rosen said taking vitamin D right now is OK, but to no overdo it. He said people should stick to supplements of about 1,000 to 2,000 units daily.

“I think it’s fine if you decide that, ‘Boy, I’m at risk, or I’m worried about COVID-19. I’m going to take 1,000 units of vitamin D.’ It’s not going to hurt at all,” Rosen said.

Vitamin D has the potential to be another weapon in the fight against the virus.

“If there is a chance that it might be effective, well then, that’s great news, and anything we can do to prevent getting the disease is really important,” Rosen said.



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